Day 1 - Tuesday September 12

 

Plenary Keynote: Driving a Battery Sector Fit for the Global Marketplace

OEMS, battery manufacturers and their supply chains all work within a global marketplace in a period of flux. The Chinese regulatory landscape presents an unpredictable puzzle for OEMs and manufacturers to keep up with, whilst federal and state level regulations domestically are no less complex given the inevitable changes of a new administration. Despite this, good EV sales predictions in the US market are chasing steady increases in European markets and exploding growth in Asia. Energy storage applications are diversifying as power demand grows while there is an ongoing need for cost reductions, increased performance, safety, durability and sustainability. This key opening session provides you with the chance to hear about the latest macro trends, how they could impact EV and battery markets and the inherent opportunities and risks for the whole supply chain.

8:45 am

 Chair's Welcome Address: Navigating Global Battery Challenges

  • What are the global trends for the battery sector?
  • What are the latest developments on the Global Technical Regulation (GTR)?
  • An update on the Chinese battery and EV marketplace and regulatory landscape
  • What can you expect from The Battery Show 2017 - key themes and subjects to follow

Bob Galyen, Chairman, International Battery Standard Steering Committee, SAE

9:05 am

Onstage Interview: Electrifying Global Mobility and Finding the Best Path to Develop Key Enablers

Mike Tinskey and Jeremy Burne will be taking the stage to discuss various subjects including the emerging model for electrification of longer range BEV's coupled with high powered infrastructure along freeways, the joint ventures involved and the setting up of emerging services for vehicles. Traditional services that customers purchase for their vehicle like parking, tolls, insurance, fuel, electricity are changing dramatically with the connected car – and automakers are embracing the changes to offer a stronger value proposition to customers. Mike will address how to ensure the auto sector can put together the best possible offering for its customers.

Speakers:
Jeremy Burne, Director of Business Development, Global MRV
Mike Tinskey, Global Director, Emerging Services – Connectivity & Electrification, Ford Motor Company

9:35 am

The Leaders Debate: The Current Challenges and Opportunities in Driving the Global Battery Market

  • The impact of the Trump administration and how the battery and EV sectors are taking steps to stay ahead of regulatory changes
  • How can US and European automotive sectors stay prepared for changing Chinese regulations?
  • Which global regions offer the most untapped growth potential?
  • How will newer tech giant entrants impact energy storage markets?
  • What is the biggest challenge currently impacting the potential growth for the global battery sector and how can it be overcome?

Moderator:
Stanley Whittingham, Distinguished Professor and Director, NECCES (NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage

Speakers:
Brian W Cooke, Group Vice President, Johnson Controls International
Bob Galyen, Chairman, International Battery Standard Steering Committee, SAE
Joern Tinnemeyer, Chief Technology Officer and Vice President, EnerSys

10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Exhibition Hall

11:00 am

Plenary Keynote: EV and Hybrid Market Future Trends

This session will bring together the leading automotive OEMs and tier 1 suppliers to give their views on the role of hybrid and electric vehicles in the future of transport as it moves towards electrification, autonomy & connectivity.

Keynote presentations will address:

  • The commercial viability of 48v hybrid technologies
  • The development of the plug in and the evolution of fast charging infrastructure
  • Is there a future for hydrogen fuel cell technology?
  • International regulation driving the industry
  • The implications of intelligent mobility and autonomous vehicles for hybrids and EVs

Moderator:
Christian Rouff, Founder, Publisher, CHARGED Electric Vehicles Magazine

11:05 am

Examining the Likely Sequence of Electric and Hybrid Powered Autonomous Vehicle Usage and Adoption in the Global Marketplace

Ken Stewart, Chief Strategy Officer, Karma Automotive

11:25 am

EV and Hybrid Market Future Trends at Hyundai Motor Group

John Juriga, Director Powertrain, Hyundai America Technical Center

11:45 am

Examining the Future Vision for HV with the Prime Plug in Toyota

Heraldo Stefanon, Manager Advanced Powertrain - Gasoline Hybrid Group, Toyota Technical Center

12:05 pm

Uber's Electric VTOL Future

Mark D Moore PhD, Director of Engineering, Aircraft Systems, Uber

12:25 pm

Discussion/ Q&A

12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Outlining the Forecasts for Global Battery Markets and how the US Sector should be Positioning to take Advantage of Burgeoning Global Markets

Accurately forecasting future battery market trends is a key component of planning a strong road map to commercial success. However, it can mean quantifying a dizzying array of fluctuating factors including past and current energy storage/ battery product trajectories in tandem with predicting market direction and identifying possible concerns or opportunities on the way. Accurate predictions could provide the answers to crucial questions such as: ‘What direction is the EV and stationary storage market going in domestically and internationally and how will US manufacturers compete?' and ‘How do different battery costs compare against wider automotive and grid scale energy prices?'. This session provides you with crucial information on the battery markets for automotive, storage and other battery applications, highlighting potentially challenging areas in both different sectors, and global regions. Participants can expect to take away fresh insight on future growth areas and the identification of new growth areas for batteries.

Moderator:
Shmuel De-Leon, CEO, Shmuel De-Leon Energy Ltd

2:05 pm

Storage Economics for the Utility Grid

Swami Venkataraman, Senior Vice President Global Project & Infrastructure Finance, Moody's Investors Service

2:25 pm

Peaker Plants vs Li-Ion Energy Storage Systems and the Non-Sexy Battery Story: Li-Ion is the Incumbent and will make Energy Storage a Commodity

Davion Hill PhD, Energy Storage Leader, DNV GL Americas

2:45 pm

How has the Cost of Li-Ion XEV Batteries Changed Compared to Lead- Acid and Other Storage Options and what are the Future Predictions?

Michael Sanders, Senior Advisor, Avicenne Energy

3:05 pm

Panel Discussion: Comparing and Predicting Battery Market Trends

  • How prepared is the battery sector for the ESS market's expected growth?
  • How cheap does energy storage on the grid need to be to make it economically viable?
  • Should batteries be treated as a commodity when discussing price?
  • When will battery cost enable cost parity of EVs with conventional vehicles, and will this be a key driver/prerequisite for anticipated market growth?”
  • What future avenues are there for further reducing XEV battery costs?

Session speakers to be joined by:
Michael J Safoutin PhD, Senior Mechanical Engineer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

3:30 pm

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

3:45 pm

Keeping up with New Technology Trends – What the Uptake of E-Mobility and Drones could mean for Battery Manufacturers?

There are more than 200 million electric bikes in China – an astonishing number established in a short time period that emphasizes the diversity of transport electrification trends globally. With consumer transportation diverging from traditional large and long range, gasoline driven vehicles; personal e-mobility options are rapidly expanding markets. The USA is often playing catch up to countries in Asia and to a lesser degree, Europe in the uptake of these new options – is this set to change? Are traditional cell and battery manufacturers keeping up with newer, nimble outfits in this exciting sector? How safe are these applications given the known risks of the batteries within them? The rapid growth of drone market applications has also taken off with numerous applications including research, delivery, the military, recreational use and even as potential personal transportation vehicles increasing the demand, and thus, the battery requirements. The specifications are diverse and the safety challenges are well documented. How have battery manufacturers tackled this demand and what are the opportunities going forward?

Moderator
Naoki Matsumura, Senior Technologist (Battery), Intel Corporation

3:50 pm

Expectations and Unique Challenges of Drone Batteries

Naoki Matsumura, Senior Technologist (Battery), Intel Corporation

4:05 pm

Meeting the Unique Battery Requirements of Personal Mobility Devices

Kenyon Kluge, VP of Engineering, Inboard Technology

4:20 pm

Evaluating Batteries for Personal E-transportation: Hoverboards, Drones, Electric bicycles & Beyond

Joseph Bablo, Principal Engineer - Automotive Equipment and Associated Technologies, UL LLC

4:35 pm

Batteries with Wings: How Electric Cars Impacted Electric Airplanes in Driving High Energy Density Batteries

Qichao Hu, Founder and CEO, SolidEnergy

4:50 pm

Uber's Urban Mobility Vision and Implications for Battery Market

Mark D Moore PhD, Director of Engineering, Aircraft Systems, Uber

5:05 pm

Discussion/ Q&A

5:15 pm

Close of Track 1, followed by Networking Reception in Exhibition Hall

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

2:00 pm

Which Advanced Cell Materials are set to Take the Lead in an Increasingly Energy Hungry World?

One of the most influential factors in battery performance is the material with which the electrodes, electrolyte, semiconductors and other key components are made. Several materials are under consideration as potential game changers for the cathode that are either currently in use or coming down the tracks soon. In addition, composites containing graphene and silicon have emerged as potential game changers. This session will outline the current status of advanced materials and a look into which chemistries are out there now or are coming down the line in the near future.

Moderator:
Prof. Jens Tübke, Director, Applied Electrochemistry, Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology

 2:05 pm Advanced Li-Ion Chemistries that Leverage the Existing Manufacturing Infrastructure

Tyler Evans PhD, CTO / Co-founder, SilLion

 2:20 pm Electrode Benchmarking Studies for Advanced Silicon Anode Materials

Dee Strand PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, Wildcat Discovery Technologies

 2:40 pm How to Stabilize High-Capacity Nickel-Rich Cathode Materials for Longer Cycle Life

Youngho Shin PhD, PE, Principal Process Development Engineer, Argonne National Laboratory

 2:55 pm 5X5: Investigating High Performing Nano Solutions for Silicon and Graphite Anodes

Vinay Bhat PhD, Principal Scientist, Black Diamond Structures

 3:00 pm Questions and Panel Discussion – Finding New Materials to Solve Performance Challenges
  • If energy density is becoming less of a problem, is power density the next big barrier to break and how can it be tackled?
  • What can we expect from graphene as a potential solution for electrodes?
  • How could the silicon catastrophic capacity issue be overcome?
 3:30 pm Networking Refreshments in the Foyer
 3:45 pm

Considering Performance vs Cost & Availability in Next Generation Materials

The cost and availability of materials naturally has an impact on their suitability to be used for an application. However, with several analysts predicting that some precious metals markets such as cobalt are set to surge this year what does this mean for the cost of a battery and what are the solutions? Which cheaper materials have come to the fore as possible solutions and how are they performing? Should manufacturers be diversifying material choice and looking for more reliable less ethically challenged products, reducing precious metal inclusion?

Moderator:
Mark Lefebvre PhD
, Senior Manager Open Innovation, Samsung SDI

 3:55 pm

Advancing Energy Storage Materials, an Update and Consideration of Potential Future Options

Stanley Whittingham, Distinguished Professor and Director, NECCES (NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage

 4:10 pm

The Availability and Demand for Lithium, Now and in Future

Suzanne Shaw, Senior Analyst, Roskill Information Services Ltd

 4:25 pm

Evolving Fiber Materials and Their Applications Inside and Outside Lithium Ion Batteries - from Energy Generation to Protection from Harm

Richard Clark, Senior Technical Specialist, Morgan Advanced Materials

4:40 pm

Panel discussion: Choosing the Right Materials for your Battery – Considerations Beyond Performance

Session speakers will be joined by a panelist to answer questions from the floor and discuss the below key questions:

  • How can companies reduce their reliance on one material whilst ensuring they utilize the best?
  • Which materials are viable choices for the growing battery markets?
  • How can the battery sector take steps to avoid ethical issues and supply risk for precious metals?
  • Which materials are showing the greatest energy density and power versus cost?

Session speakers to be joined by:
Zolaikha Strong, Director Sustainable Electrical Energy, Copper Development Association

5:15 pm

Close of Track 2, followed by Networking Reception in Exhibition Hall

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

2:00 pm

Implications of Future Intelligent Mobility and Autonomous Vehicles – What Will This Mean for the EV Automotive Supply Chain?

AI, connectivity and autonomous technologies have moved from being a side interest to a central theme in automotive development and things are moving faster than expected. This session examines the latest plans for connected autonomous vehicles and the implications for the different stakeholders in the EV automotive supply chain.

Moderator:
Matthew Doude
, Program Manager - Powertrain Engineering, Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University

 2:05 pm

How Autonomous Technology may Affect Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

Matthew Doude, Program Manager - Powertrain Engineering, Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University

 2:20 pm

Enabling Autonomous Vehicles with the Integration of New Chips, Packages and Modules

Steve Groothuis, CTO, Samtec Microelectronics

 2:40 pm

Examining the Impact of Connectivity and Automation on Fuel Efficiency

Aymeric Rousseau, System Modeling and Control Manager, Argonne National Laboratory

 3:00 pm

Panel Discussion

Key issues to be discussed by speakers at the end of this session include:

  • How are automotive OEMs modifying their production and supply chain network in anticipation of autonomous vehicles?
  • Which components are going to become obsolete?
  • How to best integrate required new chips, packages and modules into autonomous vehicles
  • How will wiring evolve as connected and autonomous technologies increase demand on connectivity: reducing wires or moving to wireless?
  • What is the future of “steer-by-wire” system wherein the steering wheel, axles and tires function through electronic signals?
  • How with EV automotive electronics evolve as dashboards become digitalised and automobiles become integrated with mobile phones?
  • Determining the impact of Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS) on EV vehicle design and how it will evolve in the transition towards automated driving?
 3:30 pm

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

 3:45 pm

Powertrain Electric Motor Developments

This session will focus on next generation electric motor design. Examining the latest innovative electric motor concepts, solutions and applications. Speakers will outline current trends in electric drive technology including, in-wheel electric drive and alternatives to rare earth magnets in electric motors.

Moderator:
Paul Menig
, CEO, Tech-I-M

 3:50 pm

Examining Protean Electric’s in-wheel Electric Drive System

Thomas Prucha, Business Development Manager, Protean Electric

 4:10 pm

Finding Alternatives to Rare Earth Magnets In Electric Motors

Robert Wolf, Vice President, Alliance LLC

 4:30 pm

High Voltage Automotive Solutions

Stephen Chilton, Product Manager, Sevcon

4:50 pm

Discussion/ Q&A

5:15 pm

Close of Track 3, followed by Networking Reception in Exhibition Hall

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

Day 2 - Wednesday September 13

8:30 am

Horizon Gazing for Future Disruptive Technologies and their Predicted Impacts on the Battery

As the world moves towards varied levels of increased electrification, finding the optimum way to meet future power demands and carbon targets is becoming increasingly urgent. This challenge is further complicated by the goalposts moving regularly as new technologies and social movements change the way energy is used by consumers, commercial organizations and industry alike. How will the Internet of Things, increased cyber security and a new, sharing economy impact affect battery requirements? This session provides a platform for experts who are leaders in their field to discuss what the future might look like and how the battery sector should make sure it is keeping up.

One of the biggest impacts could come from autonomous driving. The discussion of self-driving cars often centres around a futuristic vision of people relaxing in self-driving, shared cars which are battery powered - range anxiety is no longer an issue and charging infrastructure is ubiquitous. This reality thus far remains somewhat intangible for most people. What is already happening is autonomous feature inclusion in new car designs with their associated cost, safety and efficiency benefits, and this is a trend set to continue. Installations such as forward collision avoidance, backup cameras and lane detection software are going to begin changing the battery function fundamentally even before full self-driving capability becomes widespread. This discussion between market and technology experts on the EV and the battery will highlight what the likely changes will be and what industry stakeholders need to do to to ensure they are not left behind.

8:45 am

What Impacts can the Battery Sector expect from Future Technology Trends?

  • The Internet of Things – what’s the likely impact on batteries
  • What can we expect from the collision of the energy, power, and auto industries and how might energy storage fit in the middle of this intersection?
  • What does a future electrified America vision mean for battery requirements?
  • How to identify which new trends and applications are the ones to watch and which are just fads?
  • What needs to be done to prepare battery architecture for wireless charging and fast charging? What are the opportunities and risks?
  • Will self-parking and other self-drive features mean more demand on the battery, increased efficiency, or both?
  • How might changes such as shared ownership and self-parking affect battery performance and degradation?

Moderator:
Patrick Hertzke
, Associate Partner, McKinsey & Co.

Speakers:
Tim Grejtak, Analyst, Lux Research Inc
Naoki Matsumura, Senior Technologist (Battery), Intel Corporation
Tom Watson, Vice President & Technical Fellow, Powertrain & Vehicle Systems, Johnson Controls Power Solutions

9:30 am

Commercializing New Technologies – How the Process can be Improved for all Parties Interested in Advancing New Technology, Faster and at Lower Cost?

If all the battery technology ideas currently in the design or planning stage made it to large scale manufacturing, the battery sector would be flooded very quickly. The reality is most do not make it past lab testing even to pilot production lines before they hit either large funding or technological hurdles. With suggestions that getting new storage technology to market can cost $6 billion, knowing how and when to get funding is crucial. How can this route to commercialization be improved and how can both OEMs and start-ups better recognise future needs, encourage innovation and find ways in which to collaborate more efficiently to meet these specific demands rather than developing innovations in silo? This session provides insight on nurturing the new talent and ideas that are out there and creating a strong technology roadmap. In addition, it will expand on the message that the key for exciting new projects is sometimes to hold off marketing a product until it has been built, tested and preferably scaled up.

Panel Discussion: Improving Sector-Wide Collaboration to Match Innovation with Investment

  • What are the key elements in a good technology roadmap?
  • Where should start ups go to find out what current and future needs are?
  • How can start ups and capital investors more easily be matched up?
  • How can OEMs best stay abreast of what is happening with smaller cutting edge technology R&D units?
  • Are P3s (Public - Private Partnerships) the fastest and best way to get new technology to market?

Moderator:
David Roberts, Chief Innovation Officer, State of Indiana

Speakers:
Robert Rango, CEO, Enevate
Venkat Srinivasan PhD, Director, Argonne Collaborative Center for Energy Storage Science (ACCESS)
Andrew Hsieh, Co-Founder & CEO, Feasible Inc

10:15 am

Case Study: The Route to Investment: How Cyclotron Road found Success

Matt Price, Commercial Operations & Industry Partnerships, Cyclotron Road

10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

11:00 am

Optimizing Battery Design and Integration - Prioritizing Features to fit the Application

Traditional automotive manufacturers are choosing not to back one technology to meet CO2 emission regulations. This is both an opportunity and a challenge for the rest of the battery supply chain, meaning that different battery designs can be matched to the varying requirements and that the need for solutions is both great and complex.

There are numerous factors that are crucial pillars in the ‘perfect cell’ for any application but some issues are ubiquitous, including energy density, power density, weight, safety, life-cycle, degradation, cost and its easy integration into a battery pack. Whilst cell innovation charges ahead with new materials and developments appearing all the time, there has historically been less progress in how this would fit into a pack or a car. Unfortunately, when you increase the positive benefits in one area it tends to inversely impact another. Increased energy density can come at the cost of safety, increased safety often means heavier etc. This session will look at what the latest thinking is on battery pack design and how to find the optimal balance for a specific application.

Moderator:
Oliver Gross, Energy Storage Systems Specialist, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA)

11:05 am

Cylindrical vs. Rectangular Cells: Does Shape Matter?

Said Al-Hallaj, Chairman/ CEO, AllCell Technologies LLC

11:20 am

The Technology Trend of Next Generation EFB Batteries for Advanced Start-Stop Systems

Shawn Peng, VP of Technology, Leoch Battery Corp

11:35 am

Creating a Successful Battery System for the Chevy Bolt

Milind Gandhi, Global Lead Engineer, BEV Battery Systems, General Motors

11:50 am

Lithium-Ion Battery Integration into Electric Vehicle Topologies

Jan Wohlmuther MSc, Consultant – Technology and Business Strategy, P3 North America Inc

12:05 pm

5X5: Flexible Graphite in Advanced Thermal Management Solutions for Lithium-Ion Battery Packs

Bret A. Trimmer, Business Development Manager, NeoGraf Solutions

12:10 pm

Panel Discussion - Designing the Optimal Battery Pack

  • What needs to be considered at design stage for easier integration?
  • What are the future requirements for automotive batteries likely to be?
  • What innovations have shown promise in battery pack light weighting?
  • Are there clear trends in how different regional battery producers are designing battery packs?
12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Preparing for Second Generation 48V Battery Requirements

Despite regulatory uncertainty as to the impact of the new administration on CO2 targets in the US, the bottom line is that 48V technology is still coming down the tracks with little diversion likely for OEMs and battery manufacturers. In the global marketplaces such as the EU, 48 Volt system adoption is growing at a much faster rate than in the USA in order to meet more stringent and impending emissions goals. To keep pushing the envelope, driving implementation and reducing cost, battery developers need to look to the horizon and the second generation of 48V battery technology. There are many unknowns around 48V battery impacts and developments; this session is dedicated to addressing these questions and helping OEMs, manufacturers and their supply chains prepare for both current demands and predicted 48V technologies and changes coming down the tracks in the next few years.

Moderator:
Satish B Chikkannanavar PhD, Battery Engineer, Product Development Department, Ford Motor Company

2:05 pm

48 Volt…More Power, More Energy

Phil Shaw, Product Line Director, Advanced Battery, Johnson Controls International

2:25 pm

48V Battery Performance and Market Requirements

Carlton D Brown, Director of Engineering, Robert Bosch Battery Systems

2:45 pm

What Will Change with the Second Generation of 48V Batteries?

Angela Duren, Product Management, A123 Systems

3:05 pm

Questions and Panel Discussion: The Potential Benefits and Pitfalls in 48V Technology

Session speakers will answer questions from the floor and discuss the below key questions:

  • What does the optimal 48V battery look like?
  • Is there room for both lead and li-ion in the 48V space?
  • Will the outlook for 48V change now that regulations have been eased in the US?
  • Are the efficiency savings from 48V enough to warrant the outlay?
  • Would increased power demand in future supplement efficiency savings enough to make it economically viable?
3:30 pm

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

3:45 pm

Optimizing the Electrical, Thermal and Mechanical Properties of a Battery through BMS

Battery Management Systems (BMS) have four main objectives: Safeguarding cells and batteries against damage; extending battery lifecycles; maintaining the battery to a level where it meets the application needs and interfacing with the host application. BMS are significant pain points for manufacturers and OEMs and represent a great opportunity to drive battery performance improvements and safety. This session provides examples of passive and active management systems that can help manufacturers and OEMs optimize the batteries within diverse applications including an XEV or ESS system It will then look at innovative methods for overcoming this universal challenge in the most efficient way.

Moderator:
Joe LoGrasso, Sr. Manager- Energy Storage Systems, Electrified Powertrain Engineering, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA)

3:50 pm

Using Li-Ion BMS To Reduce Vehicle Warranty Costs

Dave Rich, LV Li-Ion Battery BFO, General Motors

4:05 pm

Is Wireless Communication the Next Big Innovation in Battery Management?

Greg Zimmer, Marketing Manager, BMS Group, Analog Devices

4:20 pm

Battery Management vs. Battery Monitoring: How One Word can Mean the Difference Between Extending the Life of Your Batteries, Instead of Watching Them Die

Wayne Eaton, Technical Sales Engineer, SBS Test & Monitoring Equipment

4:35 pm

Finding the Best Route to Ultra-Fast Battery Charging and Reducing Degradation

Nick Sherstyuk, CTO, Gbatteries Energy Canada

4:50 pm

5X5 Immersion in Engineered Fluids for Thermal Management of Lithium Ion Batteries

Bamidele O Fayemi, Applications Engineer, 3M

4:55 pm

Discussion/ Q&A

5:15 pm

Close of Track 1, followed by Networking Reception in Exhibition Hall

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

9:35 am

Addressing the Latest ESS Developments and Innovations

ESS growth has been predicted for many years now, but experts are forecasting that the tipping point is finally imminent. But what does this mean for the technology. What are the latest innovations and where are the areas that improvement is most keenly needed. This panel is the chance to discuss the latest technologies and most exciting ideas that represent the future of commercial grid storage.

Moderator:
Tim Grejtak, Analyst, Lux Research Inc

9:40 am

Comparing Li-Ion and Lead Acid for Grid Scale Energy Storage Applications

Donald Karner, President, Electric Applications Inc

10:00 am

Rechargeable Alkaline Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage

Ann Marie Scuderi, VP of Operations, Urban Electric Power

10:20 am

5X5: Distributed Energy Storage Systems

Akhil Aryan, Founder, ION Energy

10:25 am

Q&A

10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

11:00 am

What Does the Future Hold for Lead-Acid Battery Technology?

Sometimes overlooked as a part of future advanced battery trends but still globally dominating the auto battery market, the Lead Acid sector has not stopped working to remain at the forefront of technology. With impressive recycling abilities and fresh support from the Chinese sector there is still much to come from lead acid. This is a good opportunity to hear what the future of lead acid looks like and what innovations are in the frame to keep lead ahead.

Moderator:
Sean O'Kane, Senior Specialist – Energy Systems, Electrification Group, AVL Powertrain Engineering Inc

11:05 am

The Unrealized Potential for Lead Acid Technologies

Robert Flicker, Chief Operating Officer, East Penn Manufacturing

11:20 am

How Innovative Battery Architecture can Optimize Lead Acid Technology for 48V Hybrid Vehicle Applications?

Dan Moomaw, Lead Mechanical Engineer, Gridtential

11:35 am

Approaches to Improving Lead Battery Performance

Ed Shaffer PhD, CEO and Founder, Advanced Battery Concepts

12:05 pm

Panel discussion: Inspiring Future Lead Acid Innovation

  • What lead acid technology will hit the market in the next 5 years?
  • How can lead acid maximise the cost benefits to expand into new markets?
  • Is there much more room for reducing the cost of Lead Acid technology?
  • What does the lead acid battery of the future look like?
12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Taking the Next Steps with Solid State Technology – Closing in on Commercial Production

Few technologies that lie beyond li-ion have shown so much promise or garnered as much interest as solid state technologies. When compared with the market leading li-ion battery containing a liquid electrolyte there are some clear gains to be made in the power density, energy density and safety features of solid state technologies, however it is not without its challenges.

Progress has not been linear, either when deciding on whether to use solid, hybrid or gel versions of the electrolyte, or in the manufacturing development of a commercially available and viable product. There are several current barriers to integrating solid state batteries including the mechanical challenges of vibration within autos. The end goal is fabrication of a cheap, good quality, lightweight product, at scale – but the question remains as to whether this is the answer the battery sector seeks to keep meeting growing demand. In addition, the question remains as to whether it be useful for several applications or is it destined to only stay relevant to large scale energy storage systems which are less impacted by weight? Finally, for all its promise, now that tests are progressing, is it any closer to commercialization – is large scale production close to a reality? This session will address these questions and give a good overview of how close solid state batteries are to widespread manufacture.

Moderator:
Tobias Glossmann, Senior Systems Engineer, HV Battery Technology, Powertrain & eDrive USA, Mercedes-Benz Research & Development

2:05 pm

Overcoming Technological Barriers in the Development of Solid-State Batteries

Prof Jeff Sakamoto PhD, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Sci. & Eng, Macromolecular Sci. & Eng,, University of Michigan

2:25 pm

Developing High-Energy Solid-State Lithium Ion Batteries at the Fraunhofer Battery Alliance

Holger Althues PhD, Division Manager Chemical Surface and Battery Technology, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS

2:45 pm

Solid Polymer Battery—Solving The Safety Problems With Lithium-Ion Technology

Mike Zimmerman PhD, Founder and CEO, Ionic Materials

3:05 pm

Panel discussion – Addressing the Benefits and Pitfalls of Solid State Battery Technology

  • Has the challenging weight profile been tackled by solid state electrolyte developers?
  • What application factors need to be considered when deciding what type of solid state battery to create?
  • Do you see ceramic, polymer or glass electrolytes as the likely victors in solid state technology or do you see different materials working for different applications?
3:30 pm

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

3:45 pm

Taking Batteries Beyond Current Li-ion Capabilities

There are a myriad solutions promising to be the breakthrough or the answer to increased energy density, cost reduction, safety or longer life cycles. However, none is capable of improving on every parameter and each has different applications that it could benefit. This is a chance to hear about what is coming down the track a little further down the line, what to be preparing for and what applications these new chemistries might be best suited to. It’s also a great opportunity to hear which other chemistries are leaping ahead on the road to commercialization, which look like falling by the wayside and how high performing technologies including advanced flow, lithium metal and lithium air batteries might overcome key barriers and break into the mainstream.

Moderator:
Daniel Abraham PhD, Scientist, Argonne National Laboratory

3:50 pm

The Latest Developments on The Road to Viable Technologies Beyond Li-Ion

Venkat Anandan PhD, Research Scientist, Ford Motor Company

4:05 pm

Recent Progress on Development of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

Yuegang Zhang PhD, Professor, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University

4:20 pm

Enabling Lithium Metal Batteries in Diverse Application

Yuriy Mikhaylik PhD, Director Of Materials Development, Sion Power Corporation

4:35 pm

Carbon-Ion a New Safer, Faster Charging Alternative to Lithium-Ion Batteries

Greg Osborn, Director of New Business, ZapGo Ltd

4:50 pm

Panel Discussion: Where Will Battery Chemistry go Next?

  • What obstacles remain in the way of using nickel on the cathode and silicone on the anode?
  • Is there a commercial future for Li-air batteries?
  • Are any of the current technologies likely to provide a disruptive breakthrough that is big enough or should we be looking elsewhere for power solutions?
5:15 pm

Close of Track 2, followed by Networking Reception in Exhibition Hall

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

8:45 am

Next Generation Powertrain Technologies

This session will examine the latest innovations in powertrain technologies including the motor, transmission, battery and e-drive. As the industry strives to meet tighter emission regulations powertrain technologies electric and hybrid vehicles are evolving to optimize performance efficiency and cost.

Chairman’s Opening Address:
Joel Maguire, Director of Electrification, BorgWarner Corporate Advanced Engineering

 

9:00 am

Presentation Title to be Confirmed

Joseph Meylor, Senior Program Manager, UQM Technologies

9:25 am

Why Benchmarking? For Development of Next Generation Powertrains

Mark L Ellis, Sr. Lean Design Consultant, Munro & Associates Inc

9:50 am

Future Direction for 48v Mild Hybrid Vehicle Technologies

Matti Vint PhD, Engineering R&D Director - Powertrain, Valeo

10:15 am

Discussion/ Q&A

10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

11:00 am

Integrating 48 Voltage Systems and Components into Mild Hybrid Vehicles

While long term the future is certainly electric in the short and medium term automotive OEMs are increasingly looking to the electrification of conventional cars to realize fuel efficiency and reduce GHG emissions. 48V systems offer the opportunity to increase vehicle performance and enable the new capabilities from improved powertrain designs. This session will examine the impact of implementing 48V power supply systems in mild hybrids.

Moderator:
Mohamad Abdul-Hak, Manager, High Voltage Systems & Power Electronics, Mercedes Benz

11:05 am

48V Mild Hybrid Vehicle Integration

Sebastian Milan, Product Marketing Manager, Valeo

11:20 am

48V and the US/North American Market

Mark J Rychlinski, Technical Fellow - Electric Power, General Motors

11:35 am

48V Mild Hybrid Integration at Ford

Daniel Kok PhD, Manager, Advanced Electrified Powertrain Systems Engineering, Ford Motor Company

11:55 am

Delphi's 48V Mild Hybrid Vehicle Systems Activities

William Fedor, Chief Engineer Americas, Systems, Software, Functions, Delphi Powertrain Systems

12:10 pm

Panel Discussion

  • What are the key components, integration and cost implications of a hybrid powertrain design for the different P0-4 configurations
  • How effective is 48V systems in reducing CO2 consumption?
  • Are the investments in manufacture and integration costs of new electrical components and systems for 48V balanced by increased fuel economy and emissions reductions?
  • How will the functionality of low voltage stop-start systems impact components?
  • Will the increased electrical capacity of 48V systems enable autonomous and connected vehicle Technologies?
  • Does 48V have a role to play in shared service vehicle applications?
12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Thermal Management in the Electric Vehicle: Beyond the Battery

Outside the battery pack, there are growing thermal management requirements in the electric vehicle architecture as new powertrains, components and materials are introduced. The session will cover the latest research and technological advances in heat transfer and energy management; looking at new concepts for passenger compartment heating and cooling, as well as heating and cooling of vehicle fuel systems.

Key issues to be covered in this session:

  • What are the specific challenges in thermal management for electric vehicles?
  • Outlining recent innovations in cooling
  • What is the role of HVAC in overall vehicle thermal management?
  • Which technologies, components and materials play a role on thermal management?
  • What role does effective thermal management play in meeting emissions regulations?

Moderator:
Kevin M Stutenberg, Vehicle Systems Research, Argonne National Laboratory

2:05 pm

Examining Operation and Energy Consumption of EVs under varying ambient Temperatures

Kevin M Stutenberg, Vehicle Systems Research, Argonne National Laboratory

2:15 pm

Optimizing Thermal Management in the EV Powertrain

Dan Barber PhD, Staff Scientist and Application Engineer, Thermal Management Materials, Lord Corporation

2:25 pm

Fast Charge Capability and Temperature Performance requirements for EV vehicles

Oliver Gross, Energy Storage Systems Specialist, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA)

2:35 pm

Innovative Valve Technology for Thermal Management

Daniel Wenzel, Business Development Manager, VOSS Automotive GmbH

2:45 pm

EV Thermal Management: Optimized Operating Strategies under Transient Conditions

Albert Tuertscher PhD, Mangaging Director, AT engineering

2:55 pm

Thermal Management Challenges Facing Plugged-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Autonomous Vehicles

Daniel Huang PhD, Research Engineer, Climate Control and Thermal Systems, Ford Motor Company

3:05 pm

Discussion/ Q&A

3:30 pm

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

3:45 pm

Sharing Knowledge on the Latest Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Powertrain Technologies

The aerospace industry is also focused on improving energy efficiency and reducing emissions and noise pollution through electric motors and systems and high performance vehicles are constantly innovating to improve, ensuring market-leading performance. This session will bring you some of the key technologies that have been pioneered for aerospace and high performance vehicles and which are likely to transfer to the road.

Introduction:
Tim Wells, Program Manager, BAE Systems

3:50 pm

Developing Winning Formula E Electric Drives with the Latest Hybridisation Technologies and High Performance Electric Powertrains

Chris Shamie, Manager Application Engineering, Schaeffler Group USA

4:10 pm

Current Hybrid Electric and Fully Superconducting Aircraft Technology Development at NASA

Jason Hartwig PhD, Research Aerospace Engineer, NASA Glenn Research Center

4:30 pm

Update of Airbus’ Hybrid / Electric Flying Demonstrator Examining Battery Pack Requirements, Mechanical and Thermal Integration

Benoît Ferran, E-FAN Battery Technical Stream Leader - Power & Propulsion Architectures (TX3P), Airbus Group Innovations

4:50 pm

Discussion/ Q&A

5:15 pm

Close of Track 3, followed by Networking Reception in Exhibition Hall

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

Day 3 - Thursday September 14

8:45 am

Reducing Battery Manufacturing Overheads and Getting Your Products to Market Faster

Few would question the importance of manufacturing processes to battery producers especially when considering the idea that manufacturing overheads can contribute nearly half of the total battery cost. Bringing costs down requires collaboration between cell manufacturers, their suppliers, consultants and everyone involved in the assembly line. Scaling up production efficiently is crucial for the overall cost and viability of batteries but so is automation, assembly process and equipment, and quality control inspection. The lack of standardization across the sector from the design point of view has meant expensive manufacturing processes as each line is bespoke, how can this be changed, is there a more streamlined solution and how could this impact the cost, sustainability and speed of production for new battery designs?

Panel Discussion: Innovative Approaches to Battery Manufacturing

  • Now that manufacturers producing batteries in Eastern European have proved that they can compete on a cost basis with Asia, will USA manufacturers follow suit?
  • Is standardization the answer to costly and time consuming bespoke assembly equipment for each new product?
  • Is high volume still the best way to reducing manufacturing costs?
  • How much can manufacturing process improvements help manufacturers hit $100/kwh?
  • What has been learned about US battery manufacturing potential from the Gigafactory so far?
  • What is the solution to changing designs slowing down production and commercialization?

Moderator:
Bob Galyen, Chairman, International Battery Standard Steering Committee, SAE

Speakers:
Brian Sisk PhD, Vice President, Cell Product Development, A123 Systems
Nicholas Löffler PhD, Consultant – Development and Application of Batteries, P3 Automotive GmbH
Rajshekar DasGupta, Business Development Director, Electrovaya

9:30 am

Designing for Agility in Manufacturing – Using Modular Design to React to Market

  • Global regulatory changes drive frequent and significant changes to battery requirements. Also, sizing and format standardization has failed to take place in the market, driving complexity
  • Reacting to new requirements and opportunities means acting quickly – much more quickly than a typical design cycle.  Increasingly, the pace of change and increasing complexity requires the ability to be reactive and agile to meet customer needs
  • Meeting these challenges through design and manufacturing modularity.  Baselining a limited number of cell formats and electrode sets, and combining them as needed to meet new customer requirements and opportunities
  • Implementing a manufacturing strategy to purchase equipment that allows flexibility, allowing the manufacture of multiple cells on one line
  • Meeting emerging market needs rapidly without requiring a full design cycle, allowing multiple products to “share” a line keeping utilization high and costs low

Brian Sisk PhD, Vice President, Cell Product Development, A123 Systems

9:50 am

How to Get Started on an Automation Project – The Process of Scaling Up

Craig Salvalaggio, Vice President of Engineering, Applied Manufacturing Technologies

10:10 am

5X5 Advances in Resistance Welding and Laser Technology for Battery Pack Manufacture

Paul Brackell, Midwest Regional Manager, Amada Miyachi America

10:15 am

Discussion/ Q&A

10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

11:05 am

Driving Manufacturing Quality and Flexibility through Innovative Processes

The benefits of efficient manufacturing processes are not restricted to cost reduction. The quality of the end product, speed of production, the flexibility of production lines and improved integration all play key roles in a battery’s development and eventually the speed with which it can hit the market. In addition, finding a way to compete with Asian production means finding a way to make USA based manufacturing work.

Moderator:
Benjamin Wrightsman, Chief Operating Officer, Battery Innovation Center

Surrogate Li-ion Cell Development at Ford Motor Company

OuJung Kwon PhD, Cell Chemistry Technical Expert, Ford Motor Company

11:20 am

Surveying Prelithiation Techniques and Deciding which Composite is Best - Alloy, Oxide or Metal

Jeff Norris, CEO and Founder, Paraclete Energy Inc

11:35 am

GigaCoater and the Gigafactory: Improving Quality and Reducing Costs in Battery Electrode Manufacturing

William J Kays III, Process Engineer, Babcock & Wilcox MEGTEC LLC

11:55 am

Panel Discussion: Improving Manufacturing Quality and Efficiency

  • How can we automate more integration processes such as laser welding, milling, gluing?
  • How far down the line are large scale flexible lines?
  • The supply chain challenges for battery manufacturers as design diversity and demand increases
12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Keeping up with the Future of Intellectual Property Rights in Batteries and Electric Vehicles: A Replay of the Smartphone Patent Wars or a Paradigm Shift?

As electrified vehicle technology and markets continue to grow so do the patent thickets, or complex webs of overlapping patent rights that require innovators to reach licensing agreements with multiple patent holders. During the global smartphone wars, large technology companies became entangled in expensive and complex patent licensing and litigation activities as billions of dollars changed hands. These impediments can lead to business risk and slow market adoption. Electrified transportation and grid storage are significantly larger than the smartphone market and can ill afford these kinds of challenges.

This session provides an overview of several IP thickets developing in advanced batteries, engage in a panel discussion with several experts on licensing best practices from multiple perspectives, and explore strategies for avoiding battery IP wars that foster industry-wide development and growth, leading to new opportunities for making IP rights widely available while rewarding IP owners for their innovation.

Introduction: Patent Thickets in Automotive Batteries – The Race to Technology Ownership

  • High-level overview of the players and patenting trends of various current and future technologies
  • Discussion and analysis of where the thickets are and are not actually emerging?

Matthew Rappaport, Managing Director, IP Checkups

2:20 pm

Patent Pools: Emerging Solutions for Resolving IP Related Conflicts and Increasing Incentives to Innovate in the Battery and Automotive Industries

  • A presentation and analysis showing increasing risk of litigation and projections on the IP related costs emerging in the battery and automotive industries
  • How IP creation and enforcement may affect the growth of the advanced battery market
  • A discussion of potential strategies for avoiding patent thickets and the related battery IP wars that foster industry-wide development and growth, leading to new opportunities for making IP rights widely available while rewarding IP owners for their innovation

Daniel Abraham PhD, VP - Science and Business Strategy, MPEG LA

2:40 pm

Q&A

2:45 pm

Panel Discussion: Traditional Solutions to Patent Thickets: Best Practices in Licensing to Avoid Litigation in Advanced Batteries and Automotive

This panel will discuss market terms for licensing battery technology IP from the perspective of large entities, small companies, universities, and government agencies. IP owners and licensing experts will discuss their licensing experience and their perception of prevailing commercial terms and best practices as related to experiences in the field of advanced batteries.

Moderator:
John Platt, Partner, Snell & Wilmer

Speakers:
Lisa Hodgen, Assistant General Counsel, EnerSys
Andrew Filler, Partner and General Counsel, Sherpa Technology Group
Jean Testa, Executive Counsel - IP, GE Ventures

3:30 pm

Close of Conference 2017

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

8:45 am

Defining and Implementing the latest Safety Regulations and Innovations in your Organization

Paramount to all other concerns for battery producers, OEMs and end users is battery safety, emphasized by the recent, well-documented aerospace, automotive, e-mobility and consumer electronics battery problems. It has become an area that consumers are increasingly aware of and thus the pressure is continuously mounting to reduce risk, especially with li-ion batteries.

This session will highlight some of the key regulations globally that all stakeholders in the battery sector need to be aware of, and what is changing around them. In addition, speakers will address the issue of thermal runaway in an open panel discussion with some exciting solution providers bringing their innovations and insight on how to reduce the safety concerns around Lithium-ion battery use.

Understanding which Safety Regulations Apply to You

Rich Byczek, Global Technical Director - Transportation Technologies, Intertek

9:00 am

What Impact will the New UN and ICAO Transport Regulations Have on Transporting Batteries and Battery Manufacturing?

George Kerchner, Executive Director, PRBA – The Rechargeable Battery Association

9:20 am

Q&A

9:30 am

Finding Innovative Ways to Increase Battery Safety

Lithium Ion Battery Safety, From Materials to Solutions

Brian Morin PhD, President & COO, Dreamweaver International

9:40 am

Panel Discussion and Innovation Showcase – Firefighting in the Li-ion Battery

Each speaker will have five minutes to introduce their solution before discussing the crucial safety concerns outlined below.

  • Can anything be done straight away to reduce the issues experienced by users of applications with a li-ion battery?
  • What are the safety concerns for beyond Li-ion technologies?
  • How to increase safety and performance simultaneously - turning thermal runaway into a virtuous cycle  
  • How can thermal runaway be tackled at both packaging and cell level?
  • Is there enough being done to avoid li-ion issues in beyond li-ion technologies?

Moderator:
Brian Morin PhD
, President & COO, Dreamweaver International

Speakers:
Jenna King
, CEO, Amionx
Nicholas Johnson, Research Engineer, 3M
Jeremy Dang PhD, Project Manager and Research Scientist, Electrovaya

10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

11:00 am

Moving the Sector on from Recognizing the Need for Battery Lifecycle Management to Implementing a Holistic Approach

Taking a whole life cycle approach to batteries begins with accurately forecasting the life cycle of a battery and ensuring certainty of this in the field not just in the laboratory. When the battery reaches end of life, the responsibility and often any incurred cost is shouldered by the OEMs. To give an accurate estimate battery pack cost the end of life destination needs to be incorporated, whether it is a second life opportunity, waste disposal or reclamation for recycling purposes. When the battery is ready for recycling the cost benefits can vary wildly depending on the makeup and design of the battery. The ideal scenario is designing out waste at the start of the battery process, creating battery’s packs and cells that allow for easy disassembly and reuse or recycling of the components without waste. However, this is not a route commonly followed now.

The issues to be addressed in this session bring both lead acid and li-ion into the discussion with a look at what the latest thinking is, comparing the different options. It will also look at the different stages of battery production with a view to pinpointing where it can be changed to drive more sustainable, cost effective and efficient battery manufacturing with clear parameters as to who is responsible for what.

Moderator:
Jim Greenberger
, Executive Director, NAATBatt International

11:05 am

Comparing Field Data From the Fiat 500e to the Battery Validation Models

Carrie Okma, Lithium Ion Cell Chemistry Expert, FCA

11:25 am

Electric Vehicle Batteries Recycling and Reuse

Michael Worry, Chief Executive Officer, Nuvation Energy

11:45 am

3 Years' Experience in Second Life: What are the Best Applications?

Dirk Spiers, CEO, Spiers New Technologies

12:05 pm

Panel Discussion: Managing Battery Lifecycle and Recycling

  • Who should be responsible for the battery at end of, or second life?
  • Is the reuse and/or recycling of li-ion batteries realistic given the cost and safety concerns?
  • Is stationary industrial or ‘in front of the grid’ storage technology a realistic second life prospect?
  • How can the sector prevent contamination between different battery types? Is colored packaging the way forward?
12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Defining Battery Requirements for Heavy-Duty Electric Vehicles

Commercial EV fleets, electric bus fleets and other electrified vehicles such as fork lift trucks currently present growing markets for battery manufacturers and integrators, with a more predictable growth line than passenger XEVs. Moreover, commercial fleets and public buses are leading the way in the movement towards electrification with projected dominance over a 1/3 of the bus market for EV buses by 2020. The battery requirements have some key differences from the EV passenger vehicle market particularly in the pack design, performance needs, modular approach and battery integration stages where there is a gap in the market for creative designs and innovations.

Moderator:
Edward C Lovelace PhD
, CTO & VP Engineering, XL Hybrids

2:05 pm

Solving Range, Weight, Energy Density and Cost Challenges for Heavy-Duty Electric Vehicles

Gary Horvat PhD, Chief Technology Officer, Proterra

2:20 pm

New Uses and Applications for Li-ion Batteries in Large Vehicles and Systems: On-Road, Off-Road and Marine

Martin Klein, VP of Engineering, XALT Energy

2:35 pm

Advancing Adoptability and Applications For High Performance Li-Ion Batteries

Porter Harris, Co-founder & CTO, Romeo Power

2:50 pm

"Turbo-charging" Your Forklift Fleet: The Power of Industrial Lithium Forklift Batteries

Mil Ovan, President/CMO, Navitas Systems

3:05 pm

Panel Discussion: Optimizing Your Place in the Large Format Battery Market

  • What other large format industrial vehicles are out there and what are their battery requirements?
  • What cell integration challenges are commercial vehicle OEMS currently facing?
  • Is the modular approach the answer for bus and commercial fleets and what does this mean for manufacturers?
  • How can these battery developments be applied in diverse sectors such as mining?
3:30 pm

Close of Conference 2017

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.

8:45 am

Examining the Latest Technologies Driving Mass Deployment of Hybrid and Electric Buses

Globally, the demand for both hybrid and electric buses is growing. This session will examine the latest technological developments and assess the relative benefits of hybrid and electric taking into account; timescales for RoI, charging challenge, emission reduction and energy efficiency.

Key issues to be discussed by speakers at the end of this session include:

  • Developments in electric powertrains for buses
  • The role of fuel cell technology in bus deployments
  • Recent developments in energy harvesting shock absorbers for buses and trucks
  • Fast charging for buses through charging stations or regenerative breaking, the role of ultra-capacitors
  • Assessing range extender technology for buses

Chair's Opening Address

Moderator:
Fred Silver
, Vice President, CALSTART

9:05 am

How Electric Powertrains Will Help Fuel Mass Adoption of Battery-Electric Buses

Gary Horvat PhD, Chief Technology Officer, Proterra

9:20 am

Addressing the Barriers to Scalable Deployment of DC High Power Charging

Leah O'Dwyer, Director, Business Development eBus, ChargePoint

9:35 am

Functional Safety for an Electric City Bus through Tests and Simulation

Albert Tuertscher PhD, Mangaging Director, AT engineering

9:50 am

Overview EV Commercial Vehicle and Transit Bus Market

Adrian Schaffer, Vice President Sales and Business Development, UQM Technologies

10:05 am

Discussion/ Q&A

Key issues to be discussed by speakers at the end of this session include:

  • Developments in electric powertrains for buses
  • The role of fuel cell technology in bus deployments
  • Recent developments in energy harvesting shock absorbers for buses and trucks
  • Fast charging for buses through charging stations or regenerative breaking, the role of ultra-capacitors
  • Assessing range extender technology for buses
10:30 am

Networking Refreshments in the Foyer

11:00 am

Hybrid and Electric Deployments for Fleets: What are the specific considerations?

Increasingly hybrid and EV vehicles are able to compete in performance and efficiency with conventional diesels and make a compelling business case for deployment. This session will examine the different powertrain technologies for hybrid and EV vehicles and their varying requirements for fleets and trucks.

Key issues to be discussed by speakers in this session include:

  • Outlining drivers for electric commercial vehicles in the different markets including: emission control, cost efficiency, noise pollution
  • Optimizing hybrid powertrains for commercial vehicles: The move to 48V mild hybrids
  • Fuel cells for fleets with established recharge stations
  • How will Hybrid and EV fleets move towards autonomy?

Moderator:
Paul Menig
, CEO, Tech-I-M

Speakers:
Jean-Baptiste Gallo
, Product Manager, Efficient Drivetrains, Inc.
Jeffrey Esfeld, Director - Fleet Sales, Workhorse Group Inc
Jason Hanlin, Director of Technology Development, Center for Transportation and the Environment

12:30 pm

Networking Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

2:00 pm

Electric Vehicles for Off Road Construction, Agriculture and Mining

Currently industrial and commercial vehicles account for 60% of the value of the electric vehicle market and this sector is forecast to grow 4.5 times in the next decade as off-road industrial vehicles and on-road commercial vehicles including heavy industrial vehicles, buses, trucks, taxis move to electric. The sessions on this day will examine the technical and market trends for both hybrid and electric industrial and commercial vehicles and assess current and future technological developments.

Components Market Forecast: Examining the potential for global growth in electrified vehicles and related components (2017-2025)

  • Examining the key drivers for adoption and growth of electrified vehicles
  • Variations in key global regions including U.S., China, Europe and Japan/Korea
  • Impact of mobility technologies on electrified vehicle growth

Daron Gifford, Partner, Leader of Strategy and Automotive Industry Consulting, Plante Moran

2:30 pm

Electric Vehicles for Off Road Construction, Agriculture and Mining

This session will examine the growing market for hybrid and electric vehicles for construction, agriculture and mining outlining the latest technologies and assessing their efficiency and ability to meet environmental targets.

Moderator:
Bill Van Amburg
, Senior Vice President, CALSTART

2:35 pm

Future of Construction Equipment

Fares Beainy PhD, Program Leader, Emerging Technologies, Volvo Construction Equipment

2:50 pm

Component Development for Electric Off Road Vehicles

Eric Hendrickson, Business Development Manager - Vehicle Electrification, Parker

3:05 pm

Electrical Platforms & Powertrains, the 21st Century Workhorse

Gary Dannar, Founder & CEO, DD Dannar LLC

3:20 pm

Panel Discussion

  • Comparing the relative benefits of hybrids and full EVs for Off road construction
  • Meeting sustainability and clean energy requirements
  • Making the case for hybrid and electric powertrains for off road heavy duty vehicles
  • Meeting the challenge of cost-effectively delivering advanced technologies in low production volume markets
  • Autonomous vehicles for agriculture and mining
3:20 pm

Speakers to be joined by:
Vern Caron
, President, Caron Engineering

3:30 pm

Close of Conference 2017

Disclaimer: Smarter Shows reserves the right to amend speakers, topics and scheduling at any time. This website is updated regularly to reflect such changes.